Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly Reunite for Sherlock Holmes

If there’s one thing Hollywood loves more than anything else, it’s a re-imagining of a classic series or franchise. Whether it’s Ghostbusters, 21 Jump Street, or any number of comic book superhero reboots, the film industry would rather bank on a known commodity than take a risk with a new property. When it comes to sure things in the comedy genre, there are only a few stars who are almost guaranteed to bring movie fans to the box office to see them. One of those stars is Will Ferrell, who is teaming up with old friend John C. Reilly for the third time in yet another reboot of the Sherlock Holmes franchise.

Ferrell and Reilly first teamed together in 2006’s Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, and fans couldn’t get enough of their idiotic antics. The outtakes on the DVD alone were funnier than most entire movies, and it was quite clear that Ferrell and Reilly had a blast working together. The duo followed up the success of Talladega Nights with Step Brothers, an equally hilarious, endlessly quotable romp that not only further launched Ferrell’s comedy career into the stratosphere, but cemented John C. Reilly as one of the most underrated and talented comedy actors of his generation. Reilly made a brief cameo in Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues, but other than that appearance, the duo hasn’t collaborated on a project together in some time. It’s exciting to think of the possibilities that this new Holmes movie offers, with Ferrell playing the inspector and Reilly acting as his sidekick. Sure, the fact that it may be rated PG-13 could limit the amount of outrageous visual gags and profane outbursts, but Ferrell and Reilly are funny enough to make it work.

The Sherlock Holmes franchise has seen itself re-imagined as a modern day detective drama, as well as an action/adventure blockbuster, and now as a buddy comedy starring two of the most talented comedic minds in Hollywood. It’s hard to imagine this film disappointing fans, since Ferrell and Reilly’s chemistry and creativity seem absolutely tailor made for a setting as prime for parody as Victorian England.