Paul Mampilly Famous Reverse Trend Caller

Paul Mampilly started his professional career almost 30 years ago as a portfolio manager on Wall Street. He worked at a not very well known bank called Bankers Trust. Paul Mampilly managed to advance his career with the networking that he did and the great choices that he made with his clients portfolios. Paul Mampilly finally ‘made it’ when a large hedge fund called Kinetics Asset Management asked him to become their manager. Paul Mampilly brought the firms holdings from $6 billion to $25 billion over a relatively short amount of time. Paul managed to pull, on average, 26% ROI (return on investment) every year. This may not sound like a lot but think about the annual interest rate on your savings account.

His expertise ability to push his career forward and raise that large amount of money for Kinetics Assets Management has all been due to his ability to call market turns accurately. His first out of this work call was the implosion of the tech bubble just before Y2K (2000). He saw that people were getting out of control buying dot com stocks that didn’t have much of a successful business behind them. He knew that the bubble would pop eventually and began to invest in that prediction in 1999 heavily. Paul Mampilly ended up being right and the firm he was at during that time benefited greatly from his recognition of a major market turn.

According to Paul was also able to do the same thing in 2009 in reverse. After the United States housing bubble popped, he called the bottom of the market and invested much of Kintetics Assets into the stock markets and never looked back for years. This is how he has managed such great returns for them to this day. Paul also keeps up with current technologies and has been following bitcoin and the blockchain fad very closely. He again called the top in Bitcoin. Paul Mampilly says that he was able to do this in a similar way to other market turns he has predicted. It’s all about public response. Mampilly says, “the greatest warning sign occurs when there is an enormous public and popular culture interest in an asset, driving it nearly into a frenzy and driving prices sharply up.”

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