The Mummy Unravels for Universal

Universal’s Dark Universe has gotten off to a truly awful start. The debut film of the shared monster universe has garnered marginal pre-release box office and even worse reviews. Prior to the June 9 North American major release, the film pulled in over $20 million at international theaters and $2.7 million in previews.

 

Those at Universal hoping for hundreds of millions of dollars in international box office are going to be very disappointed. The film might only barely hit the $100 million mark in North America, but is likely to do much better overseas. $300 to $400 in worldwide grosses won’t even come close to the big money made by other franchises.

 

The Mummy is not launching the Dark Universe, a shared universe reboot of the classic horror films of the 1930’s and 1940’s, on the right footing. Even if the box office was below expectations, good reviews could help keep plans moving.

 

Universal is not likely going to abandon the Dark Universe too quickly, but there are surely major worries. The Mummy is not the first disappointment. Several years ago, The Wolfman remake did not deliver the desired results at the box office.

 

Perhaps the trouble with the Dark Universe is the weak attempt at crossing genres. Pirates of the Caribbean, Marvel/DC heroes, Godzilla & King Kong, and Fast and Furious are all movies rooted in action. Monsters such are horror. The previous Mummy franchise did weave in adventure quite well but, in general, monsters are tied with horror. Trying to turn the Universal monsters into stand-ins for superheroes probably won’t work.

 

All is not lost. The D.C. Extended Universe suffered several critical duds before the release of the outstanding Wonder Woman. No D.C. Comics film did weak box office, though.

 

The creative teams at Universal have their work cut out for them with the Dark Universe going forward.

 

 

David Giertz Explains Why Financial Advisers Should Talk about Social Security

Updated July 1st, 2017:

David Giertz had some sound advice on what his fellow Ohioans can do to invest in themselves earlier than they might think.  If you don’t want to spend your entire life working, and you like the prospect of an earlier retirement without the fear of outliving your money, it’s worth reading David’s insight.

David Giertz is the President of Nationwide Financial Distributors. He has over 31 years experience as a financial adviser, and is registered with FINRA as a broker.

In a 2014 interview with Veronica Dagher, a columnist for the Wall Street Journal Wealth Adviser, David Giertz stressed the importance of financial advisers speaking to their clients about social security. He discussed a survey that Nationwide Retirement Institute initiated with consumers of retirement age and within ten years of retirement. The results of the survey showed that most financial advisers were not speaking to their clients about social security. He said it’s important for financial advisers to talk to clients about social security from a retention perspective, because four out of five consumers in the survey stated that they would change advisers if their adviser didn’t discuss social security.

David Giertz explained that some advisers might avoid the topic because social security is a very complex issue and can be hard to understand. However, social security can play a big part in a client’s retirement plan, totaling up to forty percent of a client’s income. The client’s social security income should be included in the retirement planning process at https://soundcloud.com/davidgiertz. If a client starts collecting social security too early, the person could lose up to $12,000 per year.

The survey also showed that many consumers have misunderstandings about how social security works. By discussing this issue on moneytips.com, financial advisers can prevent clients from losing money in their retirement.

David Giertz’s firm, Nationwide Financial Distributors, sells life insurance and annuities, offers investment advisory services, and is a mutual fund underwriter.